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"I think we’re past that point."

— Notre Dame women’s basketball Coach Muffet McGraw, who was asked when “civility” might return to the rivalry with UConn. McGraw’s 37-0 team faces the undefeated Huskies, coached by Geno Auriemma, on Tuesday night for the national title.

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The spotlight is on UConn basketball as the women and men head into their national championship games this week. After defeating Stanford 75-56 last night in Nashville, Stefanie Dolson and the lady Huskies will face undefeated Notre Dame for the title Tuesday night.

And in Arlington, Texas, junior guard Ryan Boatright and the No. 7 Huskies can win it all tonight against No. 8 Kentucky in the mammoth AT&T Stadium. Photos by JOHN WOIKE and RICH MESSINA.

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latimespast:

The Hartford Courant turns 250 this year. The Connecticut newspaper’s first issue was published Oct. 29, 1764. (For comparison, the Los Angeles Times’ first issue was published Dec. 4, 1881. That’s almost enough to make us feel young again. It should be noted that The Times and the Courant are now owned by the Tribune Co.)
The Courant is the longest continuously-publishing newspaper in the country. In fact, it got its start before the United States was a country! The Declaration of Independence was printed in the Courant’s July 5, 1776, issue.
For more, the paper’s "This Day In History" project is impressive. Check out this gallery of Courant history. And go here for a collection of the Courant’s archival offerings.
Happy birthday, Hartford Courant. And congratulations.
— Matt Ballinger
Photo: The Connecticut Courant’s State Street location circa 1900. Credit: Courant file

Thanks, L.A. Times! We’d take a victory lap, but it’s back to work. #Monday

latimespast:

The Hartford Courant turns 250 this year. The Connecticut newspaper’s first issue was published Oct. 29, 1764. (For comparison, the Los Angeles Times’ first issue was published Dec. 4, 1881. That’s almost enough to make us feel young again. It should be noted that The Times and the Courant are now owned by the Tribune Co.)

The Courant is the longest continuously-publishing newspaper in the country. In fact, it got its start before the United States was a country! The Declaration of Independence was printed in the Courant’s July 5, 1776, issue.

For more, the paper’s "This Day In History" project is impressive. Check out this gallery of Courant history. And go here for a collection of the Courant’s archival offerings.

Happy birthday, Hartford Courant. And congratulations.

Matt Ballinger

Photo: The Connecticut Courant’s State Street location circa 1900. Credit: Courant file

Thanks, L.A. Times! We’d take a victory lap, but it’s back to work. #Monday

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During the six years of her life, Sandy Hook victim Ana Marquez-Greene loved visiting Elizabeth Park in Hartford.Today, on what would’ve been Ana’s 8th birthday, a playground in her honor will open at the park. 

During the six years of her life, Sandy Hook victim Ana Marquez-Greene loved visiting Elizabeth Park in Hartford.

Today, on what would’ve been Ana’s 8th birthday, a playground in her honor will open at the park

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On April 4, 1968, civil rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in Memphis. The Courant covered the news and the reaction in Hartford, Conn. Full front page here.

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In the closing seconds of UConn’s 60-54 win over Michigan State on Sunday, UConn guard Shabazz Napier gives the four finger salute as he heads to the Final Four for the second time in his career. RICHARD MESSINA photo.

In the closing seconds of UConn’s 60-54 win over Michigan State on Sunday, UConn guard Shabazz Napier gives the four finger salute as he heads to the Final Four for the second time in his career. RICHARD MESSINA photo.

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baltimoresun:

The call came to Baltimore’s Basilica several weeks ago: President Barack Obama needed a gift to bring to Pope Francis on his coming visit to the Vatican. Might the basilica, the first Catholic cathedral in the U.S., have something?(Why yes, yes they did.)

baltimoresun:

The call came to Baltimore’s Basilica several weeks ago: President Barack Obama needed a gift to bring to Pope Francis on his coming visit to the Vatican. Might the basilica, the first Catholic cathedral in the U.S., have something?

(Why yes, yes they did.)